Kanner Architects

These gas stations do a better job than most at catching the eye of the weary driver.

Gas stations were once the object of Frank Lloyd Wright’s fascination. Mies Van Der Rohe added one to his portfolio, and Foster and Partners redesigned Repsol stations across Spain at the end of the 20th century. But despite the gas station’s ubiquity in the American landscape, it's rare that they've been envisioned as places to, as the owner of the sleek United Oil station above recently told the Los Angeles Times, "feel special."

That’s not to say there aren’t any out there, although you’ll certainly have to look hard. Below, check out some of the best examples of not-boring gas stations we've come across: 

MORE FROM THE ATLANTIC CITIES:

What Gas Stations Might Look Like When Hardly Anyone Uses Gas

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