Reuters

It's a bird, it's a plane, it's a building!

These building projects may not have much in common, but they do share a certain affinity for the unusual. From Austria to Amsterdam, projects that may make you scratch your head even as you applaud their ambition, from Reuters.

Woman stands inside bathroom of house, which was built upside down by Polish architects Glowacki and Rozhanski, in western Austrian village of Terfens. Dominic Ebenbichler/Reuters
Construction work continues on a hotel made to look like seventy Zaanse houses stacked together in the centre of Zaandam, north of Amsterdam. (/Toussaint Kluiters/Reuters)
A house partially built in the shape of an airplane is seen in Abuja. (Goran Tomasevic/Reuters)
A very thin house is pictured at the end of a terrace in London. (Luke MacGregor/Reuters)
A man takes a picture as people wait in line to visit an upside down house built at the Centre of Education and Promotion of the Region in the village of Szymbark, Poland July 31, 2007. The upside down house created by Daniel Czapiewski is supposed to describe the times of the former communist era and the present times in which we live.(Peter Andrews/Reuters)

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