KCA Architects

A new exhibit on New York's Governors Island turns trash into funky plastic sculptures.

Another year, another quirky pavilion on New York City’s Governors Island. The FIGMENT art and cultural festival, held every summer on the former-military-base-turned-urban-getaway, has announced the latest installation to join its lineup: Studio Klimoski Chang Architects’ “Head in the Clouds,” a groovy blue-and-white structure made of donated empty milk and water bottles. The Head in the Clouds proposal beat out 199 other entries for this year’s City of Dreams competition, and is expected to go up during the 2013 summer season.

A lush park is the perfect location for daydreaming, especially about the wondrous city life. That’s what designers Jason Klimoski and Lesley Chang had in mind with Head in the Clouds. Consisting of 120 structural pillows, the installation will need to collect 53,780 milk jugs and water bottles for the construction of synthetic clouds. A small dose of blue-tinted water inside the bottles mixed with overhead natural light will emanate glowing colors for peaceful meditation.

With the help of school children and teachers, the pavilion hopes to accumulate an equivalent amount of bottles to that of the amount thrown away in New York City per hour. Further information about donating empty bottles for the pavilion will be provided by FIGMENT festival’s website.

All images courtesy of Studio KCA

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

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