Reuters

The rare and stunning fusion of steam and waves could pull thrill-seekers to the island.

Lava from a vent in Kilauea Volcano is spilling into the ocean, creating a spectacular display. The volcano has been erupting continuously since 1983, but this latest show is sure to attract visitors. But Hawaii's tourism officials urge caution. According to Reuters:

When the lava reaches the ocean, it cools, darkens and hardens into a lava delta amid an outpouring of steam. The lava delta is newly created land that is unstable and can collapse without warning. When it collapses, even visitors standing 100 yards away can be hurt because large chunks of lava and hot water are hurled their direction by the collapse.

Below, photos from Hugh Gentry at Reuters:


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