SCI-Arc/PATTERNS

The ominous, obsidian graduation pavilion is named the "League of Shadows."

(Assume the Batman voice.) "Where are the architectural renderings? WHERE ARE THEY?"

Oh, here they are. Behold the newest chapter in Los Angeles' sci-fi scene: an obsidian graduation pavilion ominously named the "League of Shadows."

If you didn't get that reference, you haven't spent enough time obsessing over the DC Comics universe. The League of Shadows – originally named the League of Assassins, hurrrr – is the band of arch-nemeses that are conspiring to overthrow civilization and... well, since I know I'll get a tiny bit of trivia wrong and provoke hot torrents of geek-rage, I'll just cite the Batman Wiki:

The League of Shadows was an ancient and powerful secret society that restored balance to places where, in their minds, the environment was affected by human corruption. Ra's al Ghul said that the League had been a check against this corruption for thousands of years. Some of their activities were the sacking of Rome, starting the Black Plague, and the great London fire.

L.A.-based architecture firm P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S submitted this bold proposal to the Southern California Institute of Architecture, which wants to build in time to hold 2013's crop of graduating students. Designers Marcelo Spina and Georgina Huljich haven't actually said they were inspired by Batman, at least from what I've read, but the name is so clearly a reference to Ra's al Ghul and the color scheme is so similar to the Dark Knight's Tumbler vehicle, not to mention the Batpod, that it's obvious to anyone with even a passing knowledge of Bruce Wayne's alter-ego that... wait a second, am I the nerd here?

Have a look:

(Images courtesy of SCI-Arc/P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S. H/t to Architizer.)

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