If you weren't looking for it, you might walk right past the Keret House in Warsaw.

Back in September, our John Metcalfe wrote about plans for the narrowest house in the world. The Keret House, which officially opened October 20, was assembled in a workshop outside the city and placed in a space between two buildings in Warsaw. The house was built for Isreali writer Etgar Keret, as well as a place for invited creators and intellectuals, according to the building's architecture collective, Centrala.

The floorplan:

Courtesy of Centrala

Here are some pictures, via Reuters, of the tight quarters.

One of the world's narrowest buildings, built as an artistic installation wedged between two existing buildings, on Oct. 23. (Kacper Pempel/Reuters)

Come inside.

A man with a bicycle visits the house on Oct. 22. (Kacper Pempel/Reuters)
A view of the house's kitchen and living room taken on Oct. 22. (Kacper Pempel/Reuters)
A man sits at the house's table on Oct. 22. (Kacper Pempel/Reuters)
A view of the house's kitchen and bathroom taken on Oct. 22. (Kacper Pempel/Reuters)
A view of the house's bedroom taken on Oct. 22. (Kacper Pempel/Reuters)

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