This thought-provoking gag is the best new thing.

Have you heard of the latest thing? It's called milking, and it's when you pour a carton of milk on your head in public.

It's been compared to planking and Tebowing, but it is much weirder, more disruptive, and funnier than those erstwhile trends -- more Duchamp than Delta Chi.

The milkers-in-chief, a handful of students in Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, an industrial city in Northeast England, thought up the scheme in their kitchen. Now, according to the Daily Mail, their house smells of rotten milk and they have piles of dirty laundry -- but also hundreds of thousands of fans.

Their video "Milking Newcastle" has been viewed nearly half a million times, and imitators have apparently been spotted from Lancaster to Oxford to Mobile, Alabama. Be sure to watch in HD.

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