This eco-friendly sculpture re-imagines the classic city square decoration.

We’ve featured our fair share of unexpected re-interpretations of cultural icons, but few are as jarring as the modern Christmas tree in Brussels’ main public square. Instead of cutting down a giant pine, the city has commissioned French firm 1024 Architecture to create a more eco-friendly option. On display until December 28, the 82-foot-tall ABIES-Electronicus presents visitors with video projections, changing light displays, and even sound installations to help them better enjoy the holiday season.

The artificial structure is made entirely of fabric-wrapped scaffolding, with aerial views of the city square. Just watch the video created by 1024 to see the structure come alive, covered in strobbing, geometric projections (is this what dub-step Christmas looks like?). For those less enthused by flashing lights, the XMAS Tree does sport a more ethereal side, with a soft glow that casts light on the historic architecture that fills the square. Of course, not everyone is thrilled with the unusual tree; Belgian Catholics have complained it is an attempt by officials to make Christmas more secular. But come on, can’t we just sit back with a cup of eggnog, spread some holiday cheer, and enjoy a giant, seizure-inducing Christmas tree?

ABIES ELECTRONICUS from 1024 on Vimeo.



Photos via 1024 Architecture

 

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

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