Reuters

With enough imagination, anything can be a playground.

As these recent pictures from Syria suggest, kids will play just about anywhere, even though they shouldn't have to. Below, images of children making due with what's around, courtesy of Reuters.

Mohamed flies kite as crows fly above a dumping site at the bank of Bishnumati River in Kathmandu. (Navesh Chitrakar/Reuters)
A child jumps on the waste products that are used to make poultry feed as she plays in a tannery at Hazaribagh in Dhaka. (Andrew Biraj/Reuters)
Sana plays on a cloth sling hanging from a signalling pole as smoke from a garbage dump rises next to a railway track. (Vivek Prakash/Reuters)
Children wade through the polluted waters of Cilincing beach in Jakarta. (Beawiharta Beawiharta/Reuters)



A boy rides on an improvised Banca made of styrofoam as he gets near crashing waves during high tide on a bay of Manila. (Romeo Ranoco/Reuters)

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