Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada

Art for airplane travelers.

In Amsterdam, Cuban-American artist Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada has created a piece of urban land art the size of two football fields -- the Netherlands' largest-ever portrait -- and you could walk past without even noticing. 

But from the air, you could not miss the fragment of a face, crafted from soil, of an anonymous Meso-American human rights activist. Rodriguez-Gerada created the piece to raise awareness for Mama Cash, the world's oldest international women's rights foundation, and their campaign "Vogelvrije Vrouwen - Defend women who defend human rights!"

"The campaign raises awareness to the plight of Meso-American women who are illegally targeted and terrorized for defending human rights in that region," the video of the project announces. 

It took only a week for Rodriguez-Gerada and 80 volunteers to build the piece, which uses five miles of rope, seven tons of straw, hundreds of cubic yards of sand and soil, and 1,150 wooden poles.

The portrait was completed to mark International Human Rights Day on December 10th; in time, it will fade with wind and rain.

All images courtesy of Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada.

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