The new building will slope up to 38 stories, with a giant courtyard, almost the size of a football field, cut out of the center.

We have some BIG news! The architectural wonderboy has done it again: Bjarke Ingels will soon be moving forward with a pyramid building along Manhattan’s west side.

Real estate giant Douglas Durst has long be pondering what to do with his almost entire block of land at 57th street and the Hudson River, and after plans for a data center, a school, and even a hip hotel fell through, BIG stepped in to create the most unique building on the strip.

Last week, city planning commissioner Amanda Burden gave her official stamp of approval for the project, which is sure to become a hot spot for shopping, dining, and—last not but least—living!

The pyramid slopes up to 38 stories, with a giant courtyard, almost the size of a football field, cut out of the center. The cutout is not only a never-before-seen feature tucked inside the facade of a New York City tower; it also provides each and every apartment a terrace.

The city’s only complication with the design was street-level integration. In an attempt to meld this new monstrosity into the Manhattan landscape, the city demanded it contain more room for shopping and dining. BIG complied and now the new complex will contain a number of retail, dining, and institutional spaces at the base of the building, making the entire surrounding area a new and enlivened neighborhood.

[via the observer]

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Tech workers sit around a table on their laptops in San Francisco, California
    Life

    America’s Tech Hubs Still Dominate, But Some Smaller Cities Are Rising

    Despite established urban tech hubs, some smaller cities are attracting high-tech jobs with lower living costs, unique talent pools, and geographic diversity.

  2. Transportation

    Will Ottawa Ever Get Its Light Rail?

    Sinkholes, winter-weary trains, and political upheaval have held the Confederation Line light-rail transit back from a seriously overdue opening.

  3. a photo of a Metro PCS store in Washington, D.C.
    Equity

    What D.C.’s Go-Go Showdown Reveals About Gentrification

    A neighborhood debate over music swiftly became something bigger, and louder: a cry for self-determination from a community that is struggling to be heard.

  4. Solar panels on a New York City rooftop.
    Environment

    New York City Passes Sweeping Climate Legislation

    The Climate Mobilization Act lays the groundwork for New York City’s own Green New Deal.

  5. A tent-like pavilion with a colorful stained-glass design in a cemetery at dusk.
    Design

    The New Art Galleries: Urban Cemeteries

    With their long-dead inhabitants remembered only foggily, historic cemeteries like Mount Auburn and Green-Wood use art to connect to the living.