This art installation seats 42, and comes complete with audio, readings and pigeons.

Have you ever been to a 55,000-square-foot playground? No? Well, luckily for you (or at least New York City residents) that’s exactly what visual artist Ann Hamilton has installed at the city’s Park Avenue Armory. On display through January 6, 2013, “The Event of a Thread is an interactive exhibition that invites visitors to participate in the multisensory installations housed within the space, including taking a ride on the 42 swaying swings.

The exhibition isn’t just a bunch of swings–42 to be precise–but is a practiced exercise in human connectivity. The hall, which is divided by a giant white curtain controlled by the swings’ motions, is also filled with readings, sound schemes, and, um, 42 pigeons, resting in stacked cages. There’s also a station for the artist, allowing her to view the exhibition through the reflection of a mirror.

"The Event of a Thread" creates a visceral experience, relying in part on the building’s architecture to produce an atmosphere of connectivity between the artwork and the guests.

Photos courtesy of Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images, Bebeto Matthews/AP, CollabCubedPark Avenue Armory, via mymodernmet

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

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