Two artists cover a Montmartre wall with more than 200 expressions of adoration.

"Ti amo." "Nian'-ni-né-sné-i-kou-nou." "Sé-rèt-lèk." "Daï-sou-ki." Those and hundreds of other I love you's litter a blue-tiled wall in the Abbesses garden at Montmartre. The sentiment, expressed in 250 languages, is meant to inspire peace and love; it covers 416 square feet. 

The wall was created by  "two artists as a rendezvous location for lovers and a lasting monument to eternal adoration." According to Frommers:

The piece of artwork was created by Frédéric Baron and Claire Kito, who originally collected the phrase in notebooks by knocking on the doors of embassies and asking their neighbors until they had collected more than 300 languages all expressing the powerful sentiment of love.

As you might expect from such an ode to humanity, admission is free. A couple of images, below:


Image courtesy of Paris Sharing/Flickr
Image courtesy of Paris Sharing/Flickr
Image courtesy of Matthieus Mueller/Flickr

Top image courtesy of Flickr user Oh Paris.

 

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