Reuters

Polar bear plunges around the world.

It's become a post-holiday tradition, in some parts of the world, to spend a couple of minutes in icy cold water. Below, plungers from London to Monaco and Prague.

Hundreds of swimmers wearing costumes take part in the annual Tenby Boxing Day swim in Tenby, Wales. (Rebecca Naden/Reuters)



A swimmer looks at other participants getting into the Vltava river after the annual Christmas winter swimming competition in Prague. (David W Cerny/Reuters)
Swimmers wearing Sumo wrestler costumes take part in the annual Tenby Boxing Day swim in Tenby. (Rebecca Naden/Reuters)
Members of the Serpentine leave the Serpentine river after their annual Christmas Day race during a heavy downpour. (Andrew Winning/Reuters)
French diver Pierre Frolla, a four-time apnea diving world champion, dressed as a Santa Claus swims with fish in an aquarium of the Oceanic Museum of Monaco. (Eric Gaillard/Reuters)


 

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