Cycles decked out in everything from Christmas lights to greenery.

The winter holidays bring out the craziness in people, and in some pretty delightful ways. For that, we should all be glad, no?

 

  Minneapolis (by: MJIphotos/Flickr)

 

  Bay Lake, Florida (by: Joe Penniston/Flickr)

  San Francisco Bay Area (by: Richard Masoner/Flickr)

 

  Hanging Christmas bike (by: Josh Delp)

  Los Angeles (by: pinguino k/Flickr)

  Chester County, Pennsylvania (by: Sharkey M./Flickr)

  San Antonio (by: Nan Palmero/Flickr)

 

  Colorado Springs (by: Jessica Feis)

 

  Holiday greeting card (by: fixedgear)

  Chicago (by: Troy Holden)

  Los Angeles (by: digablesoul/al/Flickr)

Many thanks to these great photographers for licensing their work for noncommercial use. Top image by npGREENWAY/Flickr

This post originally appeared on the NRDC's Switchboard blog

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