"I like good vandalism but you gotta know where to put it -- that's key."

"I like good vandalism but you gotta know where to put it -- that's key," the anonymous tagger known as Guess explains (in colorful language) in the short documentary below. 

Tagging is controversial, not to mention illegal, most of the time -- many viewers might wonder what's so compelling about endless typographic variations on the word "guess." If you're a fan of the gritty texture layers of street art bring to a city, however, you'll appreciate this portrait of a New York fixture. The short video is part of a series of documentaries called New Yorkers, produced by Moonshot Productions. The producers of the series, Erik Hartman, David Rowe, and Douglas Spitzer, discuss the project in an interview with the Atlantic Video channel here, where you can watch their portrait of Shaolin warrior monk Shi Yan-Ming.

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic.

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