Christina Lihan

Paper sculptures of architectural landmarks.

"Paper architecture" is typically derogatory, used to describe the architect who designs much but builds very little.

Christina Lihan’s paper sculptures of architectural landmarks and iconic cityscapes is a nice play on the term. Lihan hand carves sheets of watercolor paper to build real, three-dimensional structures that pop from the picture frame (or shadow box in this case).

She begins by drawing out the scene in charcoal, using this template as the starting point for her paper works. She constructs the "building" in layers, and usually from the oblique, so as to amplify the 3D effect. Here, miniature skyscrapers and lilliputian basilicas are rendered in great detail, with every spire, column, and mast perfectly in place.

6
3
4
5
2

All images courtesy of Christina Lihan.

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A Juggalo standing in front of Buffalo City Hall.
    Equity

    The Juggalo March Is Not a Joke

    Facepainted fans of the Insane Clown Posse are gathering on the National Mall this weekend. And they have something important to say.

  2. POV

    How to Save a Dying Suburb

    For older, inner-ring suburbs in the Northeast and Midwest, the best hope often lies in merging with the city.

  3. Transportation

    The Commuter Parking Benefit Is Seriously Hurting Cities

    The federal government spends $7.6 billion a year paying people to drive to work, and it’s making traffic and pollution worse. Here’s how some cities are fighting back.

  4. Transportation

    Portland Prepares for the Freeway Fight of the Century

    A grass-capped highway expansion in a gentrifying neighborhood? Sounds familiar.

  5. Transportation

    A Troubled Bike Share Takes a Time-Out

    After thefts and vandalism, Baltimore’s new bike share system has suspended operations for a month.