"Sketching with a band saw" is how artist James McNabb describes his process for making his micro-lumber-cityscapes.

"Sketching with a band saw" is how artist James McNabb describes his process for making his micro-lumber-cityscapes.

McNabb’s sculptures are all painstakingly carved out of wood and typically consists of two components: a large frame—either circular, rectangular, pyramidal—that delineates the boundaries of the miniature cities inscribed within. Each of the tiny skyscrapers are individually formed and intricately detailed; they assume their own character, with some zig-zagging this way and that, while others twist and curl.

The towers are aggregated in a "skyline: that’s organized along a grid or single axis, producing a dizzying, zoetrope-like effect.

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This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site

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