The world like you've never seen it before.

You may remember Rorschmap, James Bridle's 2011 website that looks at Google Earth images as if through a Kaleidoscope. The results are pretty wild — cities acquire a symmetry that recalls, for me, one of those perfect games of SimCity, or certain Renaissance planning diagrams.

Or, to take Bridle's analogy, a Rorschach test, where psychology reveals itself through inkblot analysis.

What do you see in New York?

Here's part of Paris:

Now, Rorschmap includes Streetview, which allows you to do the same thing for urban panoramas. Here's SoHo, in New York:

You can easily input an address into the Rorschmap, and manipulate a particular view. But you can't travel down the streets in Rorschmap, as you can in Streetview, so for browsing, we recommend Bridle's shortcut: press "R" and you go to a random location in London.

Honestly, though, who needs buildings when you have trees:

H/T Google Maps Mania.

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