Toothpick cities, two ways.

What a great couple of days for toothpick enthusiasts.

Yesterday, Redditor icecreammonster shared his uncle's toothpick city, an agglomeration OP says his uncle has been building since 1982. The quality of the construction is remarkable:

At this point, you might be thinking that when it comes to cities made of toothpicks, you've seen it all. But then this morning, Megan Wollerton at DVice posted this video of Scott Weaver's "Rolling Through the Bay," a toothpick model of San Francisco that Weaver has been working on since 1974.

Weaver's sculpture is nine feet tall, seven feet wide, and thirty inches deep. It is composed of over 100,000 toothpicks, from all over the world: the trees in Golden Gate Park, Weaver writes on his website, feature toothpicks from Kenya, Spain, Morocco, West Germany and Italy. Those in the Palace of Fine Arts were thrown at his wedding! (Yeah, people threw toothpicks at his wedding.)

When it comes to glue, though, Weaver sticks to Elmer's.

Oh, and it's also a marble run.

Scott Weaver's Rolling through the Bay from The Tinkering Studio on Vimeo.

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