Toothpick cities, two ways.

What a great couple of days for toothpick enthusiasts.

Yesterday, Redditor icecreammonster shared his uncle's toothpick city, an agglomeration OP says his uncle has been building since 1982. The quality of the construction is remarkable:

At this point, you might be thinking that when it comes to cities made of toothpicks, you've seen it all. But then this morning, Megan Wollerton at DVice posted this video of Scott Weaver's "Rolling Through the Bay," a toothpick model of San Francisco that Weaver has been working on since 1974.

Weaver's sculpture is nine feet tall, seven feet wide, and thirty inches deep. It is composed of over 100,000 toothpicks, from all over the world: the trees in Golden Gate Park, Weaver writes on his website, feature toothpicks from Kenya, Spain, Morocco, West Germany and Italy. Those in the Palace of Fine Arts were thrown at his wedding! (Yeah, people threw toothpicks at his wedding.)

When it comes to glue, though, Weaver sticks to Elmer's.

Oh, and it's also a marble run.

Scott Weaver's Rolling through the Bay from The Tinkering Studio on Vimeo.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Warren Logan
    Transportation

    A City Planner Makes a Case for Rethinking Public Consultation

    Warren Logan, a Bay Area transportation planner, has new ideas about how to truly engage diverse communities in city planning. Hint: It starts with listening.

  2. an aerial view of Los Angeles shows the complex of freeways, new construction, familiar landmarks, and smog in 1962.
    Transportation

    The Problem With Amazon’s Cheap Gas Stunt

    The company promoted its TV show The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel with a day of throwback 1959-style prices in Los Angeles. What could go wrong?

  3. An illustration of a turtle with a city on its shell
    Transportation

    Why Speed Kills Cities

    U.S. cities are dropping urban speed limits in an effort to boost safety and lower crash rates. But the benefits of less-rapid urban mobility don’t end there.  

  4. Transportation

    CityLab University: Induced Demand

    When traffic-clogged highways are expanded, new drivers quickly materialize to fill them. What gives? Here’s how “induced demand” works.

  5. Berlin's Friedrichstrasse will test a car ban starting in October 2019.
    Transportation

    Why Berlin’s Approach to Car Bans Is a Little Different

    The German capital will experiment with banning cars on two popular retail streets—but it’s being notably more cautious than its European counterparts.

×