A new German website alerts members about the location and content of leftover sustenance.

In many ways, the growing foodsharing movement makes perfect sense in today's urban economy; it's good samaritanism, it reduces waste, and perhaps the most compelling reason: the food is free.

The new German website foodsharing.de (currently with over 8,200 people registered to share) alerts members about the location and content of "food baskets," according to Reuters. The article notes:

It is not poverty that inspires a growing number of young Germans like 21-year-old student Benjamin Schmitt to forage for food in the garbage, but anger at loss and waste which the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organisation estimates at one-third of all food produced worldwide, every year, valued at about $1 trillion.

Below, a few images from Reuters on the gathering process.
 
Benjamin Schmitt, a supporter of the foodsharing movement, searches food in a dumpster behind a supermarket in Berlin on January 31. (Fabrizio Bensch/Reuters)
Benjamin Schmitt (L) and Helena Jachmann, supporters of the foodsharing movement, sort food found in a dumpster behind a supermarket in Berlin on February 4. (Fabrizio Bensch/Reuters)
Benjamin Schmitt (L) and Helena Jachmann, supporters of the foodsharing movement, inspect food they found during one tour in dumpsters behind a supermarket in Berlin on February 4. (Fabrizio Bensch/Reuters)
Women take food sorted out from waste bins of an organic supermarket at a distribution point of the foodsharing movement at the indoor market Markthalle Neun (indoor market nine) in Berlin on January 31. (Fabrizio Bensch/Reuters)

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Design

    The Rivers of the U.S., Collected Into a Nifty Subway Map

    A designer who spent his youth floating on rafts has conjured up a delightful transit guide to America’s waterways.

  2. Transportation

    5 Reasons to Be Wary of Elon Musk's Hyperloop

    High-speed vactrains might be the ticket for a Martian colony. As a practical transit investment for Earth, the technology has a long way to go.

  3. A woman works in a store that has a sign indicating it is going out of business, in Nogales, Arizona
    Life

    How Cities Can Save Small Shops

    Some places are already taking action, but New York City is lagging behind. Here’s a blueprint for keeping local retail healthy.

  4. The Salk Institute, near San Diego
    Design

    This Is Your Brain on Architecture

    In her new book, Sarah Williams Goldhagen presents scientific evidence for why some buildings delight us and others—too many of them—disappoint.

  5. Equity

    Why Some Women Don't Actually Have Privacy Rights

    A law professor explores the reasons why women who need government assistance are forced to divulge intimate details of their lives.