That foreign beer you're drinking may not be that exotic.

That foreign beer you're drinking may not be that exotic. NPR has put together a map of where the brands belonging to the two biggest beer companies on the planet, Anheuser-Busch InBev and SABMiller, really come from. (Note that this is before InBev potentially becomes even bigger — what with the pending litigation and all, this is more like beer Risk than beer Monopoly.) Collectively those two companies own over 200 brands in 42 countries. Note how SAB Miller dominates countries in Africa, and the two are competing over European territory. Caitlin Kennedy of NPR explains that the "the beer market is increasingly about the world outside the United States," hence "brewing giants like ABI are trying to snap up brewing operations all over the globe." Click over to NPR to see which exact beers are where:

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic Wire.

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