An installation that "wraps around the visitors," created from Superstorm Sandy-ravaged boardwalks.

That giant heart in Times Square? It's this year's winner of the annual "Times Square Valentine Heart Design" competition hosted by Times Square Arts and the Design Trust for Public Space. This year's design, called "Heartwalk," hails from Brooklyn-based Situ Studio. The installation opened on Tuesday and will be on display until March 10.

The project website notes that "this installation wraps around the visitors, providing a moment of pause amidst the country's most public space." The materials echo that sentiment. Situ Studio used wood from Superstorm Sandy-ravaged boardwalks in the Rockaways, Queens, and Long Beach, as well as New Jersey's Sea Girt and Atlantic City. Heartwalk is a strikingly natural-looking structure amid the concrete jungle of Times Square.

And it's also become a great photo-op for couples, babies, little furry dogs, and even someone dressed as Elmo.

(And if you happen to be in the Square around midnight during February, look up and see love notes replace billboards.)

People take pictures in "Heartwalk" in New York on February 12. (Keith Bedford/Reuters)

Lede image: Keith Bedford/Reuters

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