Balloons, teddy bears, and kissing contests.

Today, perhaps one of the most dreaded and most adored holidays, is a day for celebrating love.

Across the world, people stock up on red balloons, roses, and oversized teddy bears — widely-accepted symbols for "I love you." In some cities, couples participated in mass weddings and kissing contests. (As an aside, if you are looking for some adorable city-themed Valentines, check out these by The Baltimore Sun and The San Francisco Bicycle Coalition.) Some images of the global love-fest from Reuters, below.

A man holds heart-shaped balloons while riding on a motorcycle in Lahore on February 14. (Mohsin Raza/Reuters)
Zahra, 8, carries her niece while her sister prepares flowers to sell in Islamabad on February 14. (Zohra Bensemra/Reuters)
Couples compete during the "Kiss on the Ice" contest to share the longest kiss in Russia's Siberian city of Krasnoyarsk on February 13. (Ilya Naymushin/Reuters)
An Iraqi resident shops for a gift during Valentine's Day in Baghdad on February 14. (Mohammed Ameen/Reuters)
Thai groom Prasit Rangsiyawong (R), 29, kisses his bride Varuttaon Rangsiyawong, 27, during a wedding ceremony ahead of Valentine's Day in Prachin Buri province, east of Bangkok on February 13. Three Thai couples took part in the wedding ceremony arranged by a Thai resort, aimed to strengthen the relationships of the couples by doing fun activities. (Kerek Wongsa/Reuters)

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