Gary Gale

Depending on your capacity for innuendo, of course.

For those of you looking to imitate the famous Jackass skit that took place in Mianus, Connecticut, geographer Gary Gale has prepared some excellent source material.

It's a map called "Vaguely Rude Place Names of the World," and its purview runs from the classic (Lake Titicaca, Peru) to the obscure (Pee, Liberia). Gale has combed through the a vast geographical range, too, from Crap, Albania to Shag Point, New Zealand and beyond.

The map has a bias, of course: it is only funny if you speak English, and the names are additionally biased towards British English. Are foreign (and domestic) place names as humorous in other languages?

To appreciate the map in full, you'll need to click through it on Geotastic. Many of the place names are, at any rate, too inappropriate to publish in so suggestive a manner on this website.

All images courtesy of Gary Gale.

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