Go into a grocery store. Pretend to fall down while carrying two gallons of milk. Post on the Internet.

What is it with kids and their milk nowadays? Before, you couldn't force them to drink the moo juice, and now they're flailing all around in it like they're on fire and milk is the only thing that can put it out.

If you recall your high-larious off-the-wall fads of late, first there came a bunch of guys pouring cartons of milk over themselves in public places. "Milking" blazed fiercely for about half a second before falling into obscurity. It was fun, but it didn't involve the ingredient of personal danger that made "planking" such a popular and lethal worldwide hit.

So will "gallon smashing" – the act of pretending to trip in a grocery store while throwing gallons of milk or juice to the floor – catch on where milking didn't? Who cares. Honestly, the only reason this is posted here is in case it turns out that one of these kids severely sprained a tailbone, the grocery-store employees who cleaned up their messes can get a good laugh watching it happen.

If you're wondering who the geniuses behind gallon smashing are, DCist identifies them as "Stupid Jerkass Northern Virginia Teenagers," which having grown up in the area sounds about right. The site also offers the proper etiquette for dealing with them should you cross paths in the dairy aisle: If you spot a "teenager sprawled on the floor of a supermarket after appearing to drop his groceries, just leave him there and don't offer any assistance."

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A photo of a Family Mart convenience store in Japan.
    Life

    The Language Debate Inside Japan's Convenience Stores

    Throughout Japan, store clerks and other service industry workers are trained to use the elaborate honorific speech called “manual keigo.” But change is coming.

  2. Design

    Will Copenhagen’s Eco-Friendly Man-Made Islands Pay Off?

    The Danish capital is expanding its land mass and creating climate resiliency. But is it sustainable?

  3. A brownstone in Brooklyn, where Airbnb growth has been particularly strong in recent years.
    Life

    What Airbnb Did to New York City

    Airbnb’s effects on the city’s housing market have been dramatic, a report suggests. And other cities could soon see the same pattern.

  4. A woman at a homeless encampment in Anaheim, California
    Life

    The Unhappy States of America

    Even with the economy humming, Americans are feeling more anxious, depressed, and dissatisfied with their lives than they did in 2009.

  5. A photo of people waiting for a bus in Baltimore, MD.
    Perspective

    Hard Lessons From Baltimore’s Bus Redesign

    After losing a $2.9 billion light-rail project, the transit-dependent city got a rebooted bus system. But ridership and reliability has barely budged.