Reuters

Haven't you always wanted to sleep in a rusty car lofted over Amsterdam?

I'll be honest; the conceits of some of these hotels are so extreme, I'm not sure I'd really even want to stay in them. From rusty lofted cars to beds made of ice, Reuters has dug up some of the strangest hotels in the world:

A car, with an interior that has been converted into a bedroom, sits mounted on 12-foot-high poles outside an Amsterdam hotel. Italian artist Federico D'Orazio turned the small family car into a cosy love nest to encourage more love in the city of Amsterdam. (Robin van Lonkhuijsen/Reuters)

"Hotel Everland," a creation by Swiss artists Sabina Lang and Daniel Baumann, is craned on the roof of Paris Modern Art Museum, the "Palais de Tokyo, site de creation contemporaine", October 16, 2007. The "Hotel Everland" is an art installation consisting of an actual one-room hotel offering 1970s-style glamour, artistic cachet, a view of the Eiffel Tower and will remain in place on the roof of the museum until November 2008, functioning as both a museum exhibit and a room where people can stay overnight. (Philippe Wojazer/Reuters)
The Cabin is seen under construction on the site of Treehotel in the Swedish village of Harads. A lofty new hotel concept is set to open in a remote village in northern Sweden, which aims to elevate the simple treehouse into a world-class destination for design-conscious travellers. Treehotel, located in Harads about 60 km south of the Arctic Circle, will consist of four rooms when it opens on July 17th: The Cabin, The Blue Cone, The Nest and The Mirrorcube. (Matt Cowan/Reuters)
Tourists have dinner inside the Balea Lac Hotel of Ice in the Fagaras mountains, 184 miles northwest of Bucharest December 28, 2011. Entirely made of ice, the hotel offers accommodation in 10 double rooms with king size beds, where the temperature is between -2 and +2 degrees Celsius, at a price of 35 Euro ($45.73) per person. (Radu Sigheti/Reuters)
Two Yorkshire terriers Billy (R) and Jully (L), sit on the bed at a pet motel in Sao Paulo. The doggy love motel, complete with a heart-shaped mirror on the ceiling and a headboard resembling a doggy bone, has opened for amorous pooches in Brazil. The doggy love motel in Sao Paulo, South America's largest city, was inspired by the thousands of such establishments that rent rooms to Brazilian couples for four-hour periods for trysts. The air-conditioned pet love motel room, with a paw print decorative motif, has a special control panel to dim the lights, turn on romantic music or play films. The dog motel, which opened this month, costs 100 reais ($41) for two hours. (Fernando Cavalcanti/Reuters)

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