Gestalten

Inside a beautiful new collection of "maps you shouldn't trust yet cannot help but fall for."

The rise of photography put painters in a bind. Since the late Middle Ages, Western artists had relentlessly refined their technique in an attempt to craft the perfect imitation of life. But the new technology quickly surpassed their efforts. What, then, was the purpose of painting?

Mapmakers today stand at a similar crossroads. Digital maps -- especially the cartographic empires of Google and the GPS companies -- not only provide instant, up-to-date plans of the entire world, but also offer directions and even transit guidance. What makes any non-satellite map necessary?

One response, which I explored in a post in December, is for mapmakers to try to beat Google at its own game. By embracing digital technology and open data, geographers can add a third dimension to maps, plotting population, income, rent, transit ridership, and more atop a familiar geography.

Or they can do the opposite, and try to resurrect what the digital behemoths have tossed aside: they can make maps beautiful, strange, or useful in more limited, particular ways. That's the path outlined in A Map of the World: The World According to Illustrators and Storytellers, a new atlas that prizes invention over navigation.

"Here, mapping is a personal affair," Antonis Antoniou writes in the preface, "and like in portraiture, can be caricatural, abstract, mysterious... These are maps you shouldn't trust yet cannot help but fall for -- they are the femme fatales of cartography."

In the category of maps not to trust we might put Dorothy's "Film Map", which melds nearly 1,000 geographically named films into an imaginary city. Below, a vertical section of the map, which also includes Miracle on 34th Street, Road to Perdition, and Field of Dreams.

Dorothy, "Film Map" from A Map of the World, Gestalten

Others depict real places, but in new ways, like these two maps of London. The first, "London" by Vic Lee, shows the city as the sum of its neighborhoods and landmarks:

Vic Lee, "London," from A Map of the World, Gestalten

Famille Summerbelle's "Paper Cut Maps" depict nearly the same area, but the impression is vastly different:

Famille Summerbelle, "London/UK," from A Map of the World, Gestalten

But smaller cartographers haven't abandoned the navigation business entirely. Borgarmynd's map of downtown Reykjavik, which is distributed free to visitors, blends the utility of a map with the charms of an illustration. Here's a close-up:

Borgarmynd, "Reykjavik Center," from A Map of the World, Gestalten

Likewise, James Gulliver Hancock's maps of Rome and Venice were intended to guide visitors around the main shopping streets. (Details were later added.)

James Gulliver Hancock, "Venezia," from A Map of the World, Gestalten

But sometimes less is more. Many urban mapmakers featured in the book take a middle road, sprucing up a stylized street map with some choice landmarks, as in Katherine Baxter's map of New York:

Katherine Baxter, "New York Poster," from A Map of the World, Gestalten

Or Jon Frickey's map of Munich, "Meine Stadt." Frickey has created similar maps for dozens of cities over the past six years.

Jon Frickey, "Meine Stadt (Munich)," from A Map of the World, Gestalten

And then there are subject specific maps. Like transit diagrams that distort geography to suit the subject, Caroline Selmes "Madrid Tapas Routes" is a guide intended for one purpose only:

Caroline Selmes "Madrid Tapas Routes," from A Map of the World, Gestalten

And that's only a fraction of the over 200 maps in this book, ranging in scope from cities to countries to the world. Nearly all of them have been produced in the last ten years. They are printed with neither category nor commentary, united by the fact that they represent a third way in mapmaking. They have something Google does not: the element of surprise.

Antoine Corbineau, "BThere Magazine Maps (Marseille)" from A Map of the World, Gestalten

All images courtesy of Gestalten.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Transportation

    You Can’t Design Bike-Friendly Cities Without Considering Race and Class

    Bike equity is a powerful tool for reducing inequality. Too often, cycling infrastructure is tailored only to wealthy white cyclists.

  2. Transportation

    With Trains Like Schwebebahn, No Wonder Germans Love Public Transit

    Infrastructure like this makes it clear why Germany continues to produce enthusiasm for public transit, generation after generation.

  3. a photo of high-speed rail tracks under construction in Fresno, California.
    Transportation

    Think of California High-Speed Rail as an $11 Billion Streetcar

    California Governor Gavin Newsom’s plan to complete only a Central Valley segment of the rail link risks turning the transportation project into an economic development tool.

  4. Amazon HQ2

    Without Amazon HQ2, What Happens to Housing in Queens?

    The arrival of the tech company’s new headquarters was set to shake up the borough’s real estate market, driving up rents and spurring displacement. Now what?

  5. A photo of a new car dealership
    Transportation

    Subprime Auto Loans Are Turning Car Ownership Into a Trap

    A record 7 million Americans are three months late on their car payments, revealing what could be cracks in the U.S. economy.