"If ya don't see it, we don't have it."

"We no serve tomatoes, we no serve avocados, no liverwurst, ketchup, mayo ..." Walter Momentè says. "This is no regular deli! We try to keep it as Italian as possible." Customers don't seem to mind these exacting standards, lining up for Alidoro's mouthwatering sandwiches. This short documentary from the New Yorkers series follows Momentè through an average day, sourcing authentic ingredients from local businesses, making stops at two bakeries for various kinds of bread.

The ongoing documentary series from Moonshot Productions is a celebration of the larger-than-life characters that populate the city, from a graffiti artist to an ice sculptor, and many more. The producers of the series discuss the project in an interview with the Atlantic Video channel here

For more videos from Moonshot Productions, visit http://moonshot-productions.com/.

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic.

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