Reuters

Scenes from the streets of Yangon.

In Yangon, the former capital of Myanmar, bustle is pulsing through the streets. Cars and buses fight for space in this city of 5 million. According to the Washington Post, it wasn't always like this. They write:

A year ago, the city's roads were less congested. Unable to afford the $50,000 price tag for a used car, residents had to rely on buses and bikes (motor and pedal) and their own two feet. Then the new government lowered the cost to $10,000, creating a sticky conveyor belt of metal and exhaust

Below, scenes from Yangon right now.

A man sews at a shop beside a street in Yangon. (Soe Zeya/Reuters)
Buddhist monks walk in front of the Myanmar Port Authority building as they cross a road in Yangon. (Reuters)
A man sits at a Hindu temple in Yangon. (Soe Zeya Tun/Reuters)
A man eats at a street side stall in Yangon. (Soe Zeya Tun/Reuters)

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