Reuters

Urban explorer Moses Gates wormed his way up to the very top, far higher than where elevator service cuts off.

Despite our ability to look at entire cities from outer space, the built environment still has an air of mystery about it. In one hand, you spin around the globe, stopping periodically to zoom in on your browser to inspect a peculiar geographic feature or building form, while with the other you clutch your morning bagel — all the while gazing up at the tower just outside your window. Or that’s what my morning looked like today, anyway. What goes on up there, at the tops of skyscrapers? And why doesn’t the internet have an answer?

Well, now it does. If you’ve ever wondered what kind of Eyes Wide Shut-party business went down inside the shimmering spire of the Chrysler Building, you’ll be let down (?) to discover that there is nothing going on in there.

The tower’s iconic chrome-plated cap actually conceals a chaotic web of concrete supports and levels of mechanical and electrical equipment. This earth-shattering insight comes to us via urban explorer and author Moses Gates, who recently wormed — as in traveled through crawl space after crawl space — his way up to the very top of the Chrysler Building, far higher than the 71st floor where elevator service cuts out. Gates, who in the video “tour” is accompanied by the Opie half of the radio DJ/loudmouth duo, Opie and Anthony, expresses more than a tinge of disappointment to find the cacophonic concrete structure rather than the gleaming interior spaces promised by the glam-y exterior. You and me both.

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

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