Artist André Chiote's simple geometric lines and bold colors reduce modern architecture to a few building details or formal snapshots.

Yeah, we thought minimalist posters were done, too. Still, though they’re a little late to the game, these prints by Portuguese artist and illustrator André Chiote are intriguing in their own right. Chiote’s work delivers everything we’ve come to expect (and smugly sneer at) from the design meme: simple geometric lines and bold colors that consume the entirety of the composition. Here, the modern and contemporary structures Chiote takes as his subjects are, for the most part, reduced to a few building details or formal snapshots. Context doesn’t enter the equation, except in the case of Niemeyer’s Niterói Contemporary Art Museum, where the hills of Rio de Janeiro entice in the background.

Chiote’s cannon is vast, ranging from modernist icons like Breuer’s Whitney museum and a couple of Niemeyer works to newer landmarks like Gehry’s Vitra Design Museum, Zumthor’s Kolumba Museum, Piano’s LACMA. Inclusions like UNStudio’s Mercedes-Benz Studio and Eduoardo  Souto de Moura’s Casa das Histórias seemed to have made the cut for their easy transposition to the medium.


All images: André Chiote

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

 

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. photo: Former HUD secretary Julián Castro
    Equity

    How to Head Off a Coronavirus Housing Crisis

    Former HUD secretary and presidential candidate Julián Castro has ideas for state and federal leaders on protecting vulnerable renters from a housing disaster.

  2. photo: a For Rent sign in a window in San Francisco.
    Coronavirus

    Do Landlords Deserve a Coronavirus Bailout, Too?

    Some renters and homeowners are getting financial assistance during the economic disruption from the coronavirus pandemic. What about landlords?

  3. Equity

    We'll Need To Reopen Our Cities. But Not Without Making Changes First.

    We must prepare for a protracted battle with coronavirus. But there are changes we can make now to prepare locked-down cities for what’s next.

  4. Coronavirus

    Black Businesses Are Not Getting the Coronavirus Relief They Deserve

    The latest U.S. coronavirus aid package promises a partial and uneven economic recovery that leaves behind the African American community.

  5. photo: South Korean soldiers attempt to disinfect the sidewalks of Seoul's Gagnam district in response to the spread of COVID-19.
    Coronavirus

    Pandemics Are Also an Urban Planning Problem

    Will COVID-19 change how cities are designed? Michele Acuto of the Connected Cities Lab talks about density, urbanization and pandemic preparation.  

×