Those toes are 2,722 feet up!

A couple months back, we showed you what exactly a "Cruise-eye view" was. In case you missed it—in which case go to that post now—it’s the view from the top of the Burj Khalifa, the world’s largest tower.

Why the "Cruise-eye view"? Because Tom Cruise was seen dangling from it in the blockbuster (and surprisingly entertaining) film Mission Impossible 4: Ghost protocol. Well, seems like the view might need a new moniker. Earlier this week, fearless photographer Joe McNally uploaded this image on his Instragram feed.

The picture, which we can only assume was taken with shaky, shaky hands (that’s 2,722 feet up!), shows McNally’s worn pair of shoes hovering over the edge of the Burj and Dubai. Wrote the shoe-gazing McNally, "My old battered shoes climbed the world’s tallest building today. What an amazing structure! Tweeting from 820 meters straight up!"

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

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