The gigantic French green space is being billed as a "metropolis of retail, culture, and leisure."

Before we could even finish saying "trash-incinerator-ski-slope," BIG has dished out another dazzling showcase of founder Bjarke Ingels’s "hedonistic sustainability" concept: the Danish wunderkind and his firm were recently announced as the winning designers for EuropaCity, an 80-hectare cultural and commercial destination between Paris and Roissy in France that is being described by the architects as "a laboratory for sustainable technologies." Sure enough, the renderings are drenched in neon green, illustrating the crowning achievement of the design: an enormous continuous green roof spanning over a new metropolis of retail, culture, and leisure.

As Ingels himself explained in a press release, EuropaCity will be "an experimental hybrid between urbanism and landscape design." The scheme exhibits BIG’s signature design move of crossbreeding conventional architectural forms, except bumped up to the urban scale: “Center and periphery overlapped in the simultaneous coexistence of a recreational open landscape of rolling hills superimposed on an urban neighborhood of walkable streets, plazas and parks,” said Ingels. Thus BIG — who worked alongside Tess, Transsolar, Base, Transitec and Michel Forgue to complete the proposal — has condensed into a single destination a cosmopolitan center with retail shops, concert halls, spas, swimming pools, and, believe it, a skiing hill, and an immense outdoor landscape in the form of a sprawling green roof with hills and valleys providing breathtaking views of central Paris.

EuropaCity is expected to be a more or less self-sustaining urban entity, powering itself with solar, biofuel, and geothermal energy and also recycling resources such as water and heat and even providing other neighborhoods in suburban Paris with heating and cooling. “We find that Paris these years is taking on a holistic effort to ensure that the urban periphery is given equal opportunity to be as lively and inhabitable as its historic center," said Ingels. "EuropaCity will be an important step in this agenda."

All images courtesy of BIG. This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A photo of a police officer in El Paso, Texas.
    Equity

    What New Research Says About Race and Police Shootings

    Two new studies have revived the long-running debate over how police respond to white criminal suspects versus African Americans.

  2. A map of Minneapolis from the late 19th century.
    Maps

    When Minneapolis Segregated

    In the early 1900s, racial housing covenants in the Minnesota city blocked home sales to minorities, establishing patterns of inequality that persist today.

  3. A map of population density in Tokyo, circa 1926.
    Maps

    How to Detect the Distortions of Maps

    All maps have biases. A new online exhibit explores the history of map distortions, from intentional propaganda to basic data literacy.

  4. A hawk perches on a tree in the ramble area of Central Park in New York.
    Equity

    The Toxic Intersection of Racism and Public Space

    For black men like Christian Cooper, the threat of a call to police casts a cloud of fear over parks and public spaces that others associate with safety.

  5. A Seoul Metro employee, second left, monitors passengers, to ensure face masks are worn, on a platform inside a subway station in Seoul, South Korea.
    Transportation

    How to Safely Travel on Mass Transit During Coronavirus

    To stay protected from Covid-19 on buses, trains and planes, experts say to focus more on distance from fellow passengers than air ventilation or surfaces.

×