Reuters

The portraits were taken in a giant photo booth in Tribeca.

Two years ago, French artist JR conceived of a "global art project" that would span cities and time. Inspired by large-scale street pastings, he came up with Inside Out. "The concept of the project is to give everyone the opportunity to share their portrait and a statement of what they stand for with the world," JR wrote on his website.

Over the next two years, JR installed 120,000 black-and-white portraits in over 100 countries. Not all of the pictures are displayed so ambitiously as the images pasted on the sidewalks of Times Square this week. Sometimes, JR will invite a community to submit pictures of themselves via email.

In this case, New Yorkers "shot" self-portraits in a photo booth set up at the Tribeca Film Festival. Below, a couple more shots Mike Segar of Reuters

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