Mike Doyle

Mike Doyle's model uses 200,000 LEGOs; it's the first in a series of thematically-linked works.

No one, I repeat, no one can do LEGO like Mike Doyle can. His Halloween-themed LEGO sculptures used approximately 130,000 of the famed plastic bricks to build large models of crumbling Victorian houses. Now, Doyle is back with a larger and much more ambitious project: Contact 1, the first entry in a series of thematically-linked works that celebrate “terrestrial contact events, spiritual beings and unique worlds.” Wait, whaaaa?

Doyle’s series will shed light on more elevated states of beings through the manically detailed, impressively constructed cities he has and continues to build. With Contact 1, he’s built an imaginary city of near Minas Tirith-like scale, complete with pixelated towers, forests, and waterfalls. It’s called Odan, home to an enlightened species that evolved from us but dropped the lousy inter-species killing thing, and it is dedicated solely to the development of its inhabitants cultural and spiritual needs. It also took Doyle 600 hours to assemble the huge 5 X 6 feet-wide project, which comprises 200,000 LEGO bricks and a whole lot of nonsense. Whether you buy into or are intrigued by Doyle’s conceptual backstory or not, his creation is stunning in many ways.

Told ya. Look at that detail! If you’d like to support Doyle in completing the massive LEGO cycle, visit his Kickstarter.

All images courtesy of Mike Doyle. This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

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