Reuters

The process of mining that salt can produce beautiful landscapes.

Over at The Atlantic's In Focus blog, Alan Taylor has pulled together a collection of stunning pictures of salt mines from around the world. As he writes:

The process of mining that salt can produce beautiful landscapes, including deep, stable caverns, multicolored pools of water, and geometric carvings. Some of these locations have even become tourist destinations, serving as concert halls, museums, and health spas touting the benefits of halotherapy.

As always, see a lush, full collection of pictures over at The Atlantic's In Focus blog.

One of the colorful brine pools that are part of a lithium salt pilot plant on the Uyuni salt lake, which holds the world's largest reserve of lithium, located at 3,656 meters (11,995 ft) above sea level in southwestern Bolivia. (Reuters/David Mercado)
An aerial view of the brine pools and processing areas of the Soquimich lithium mine on the Atacama salt flat, the world's second largest salt flat, in the Atacama desert of northern Chile. (Reuters/Ivan Alvarado)
Tourists visit The Saint Kinga's Chapel in the Wieliczka Salt Mine near Krakow, Poland. According to the Supervisory Board of the Wieliczka Salt Mine, the historic mine extends for a total of about 186 miles and functioned continuously since the Middle Ages until 1996 when the salt bed ceased to be exploited completely. The mine, which is on the UNESCO's Cultural and Natural Heritage list, currently serves tourism, museum and health purposes. (Reuters/Kacper Pempel)

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