Aguilardo/Wikimedia Commons

Plus thematic challenges!

We've seen quite a few geographic guessing games lately that build off of Google's immense Streetview database. But LocateStreet takes it to the next level.

It's multiple choice, which makes the choices a bit easier. And it seems to provide a better level of geographic randomness than some similar games. But best of all, in addition to the "Worldwide" mode, you can choose from a number of different styles of gameplay.

Want to play only within one city? You can do that. You can also play a guessing game for America's top metro areas, or National Parks. Or if you're really feeling like a challenge, play the guessing game that places you at a random Mexican archaeological site. It's practically impossible, but the scenery is great.

Top photo: Kohunlich, Mexico, via Aguilardo/Wikimedia Commons.

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