Reuters

Once, developers dreamed of building "the largest amusement park in Asia." But no longer.

Oh, dreams deferred. In 1998, developers broke ground on an ambitious building project outside of Beijing. They promised "the largest amusement park in Asia."

Shortly after that, funds were withdrawn, thanks in a large part to land sale disagreements between developers and local farmers. The half-finished park then languished for years. As we reported, via Architizer, in 2011:

The park is strewn with fragments of anachronistic landmarks, anchored by an unfinished fairytale castle whose inchoate construction dissolves into the smog.

13 years later, the abandoned park is finally coming down, though it's not clear what will take its place. According to Reuters, local officials are reporting that a shopping center may fill at least part of the space. Below, images via Reuters:



A view of entrances to an abandoned building which lead into a derelict amusement park called 'Wonderland', on the outskirts of Beijing  (David Gray/Reuters)



A view of a vacant carpark in front of abandoned buildings that were to be part of an amusement park called 'Wonderland', on the outskirts of Beijin. (David Gray/Reuters)



A farmer carries a shovel over his shoulder as he walks through an abandoned building, that was to be part of an amusement park called 'Wonderland', to tend his crops on the outskirts of Beijing. (David Gray/Reuters)

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