Geoguessr

Guess your location using Streetview.

A few months ago, we spent a long time playing the devastatingly difficult city-guessing game Pursued, which puts you in a random city and asks you to name it.

Now we have a new hobby: Geoguessr, which drops you anywhere that Google has put its Streetview cameras in use. (Though it seems heavily biased towards Australia, for some reason.)

You get as much time as you need to figure out the location, and if you're so inclined, you can move around as well, hunting for language, infrastructure, terrain, and other giveaways. Unlike Pursued, you get points for proximity, so if you can nail down that something is in the Midwest or New Zealand, you don't need to pinpoint its exact location.

Then, you can share your "game" -- a series of five random landscapes -- with friends, to see if they can beat your score. My high score was 11,049, and you can play with the same five landscapes here.

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