The giant artificial orb would sit in the middle of the harbor and change color throughout the day to replicate solar effects.

Miami tends to have a reputation for glitz and bombast, whether from the need to impress at the beach, or stemming from the city’s role as a financial and cultural center for Latin America. Miami Sun, a new project from Swedish design duo Visiondivision, capitalizes on this reputation with a proposal for a landmark in Bayfront Park, adjacent to downtown.

Miami Sun is exactly what its name suggests: a giant artificial sun in the middle of the harbor. This installation is meant to attract tourists and residents alike with vibrant digital sunsets, and at night, by turning into a giant moon. Lit from within by solar-powered lights, Miami Sun changes color throughout the day, replicating solar effects while screening viewers from ultraviolet waves.

Behind the Sun’s gridded façade, visitors gamble at a multistory casino topped by an observation deck. Reached by small boats, the Sun aims to be a major attraction for cruise ship passengers as, in addition to the casino, a large pool extends between the Sun and Bayfront Park, peppered with an idyllic archipelago. You may not get a tan from Miami Sun, but you will feel the architectural heat. See below for more images.

All images courtesy Visiondivision. This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

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