We'll finally be able to enjoy Krusty burgers and drink Duff Beer.

New York is iconic and Chicago famous, but the town Americans know best is undoubtedly Springfield, the cartoon town of the Simpsons, our home on Sunday night television and countless reruns for the last 25 years.

So it's with some trepidation that we see that Universal Orlando Resort will be assigning a sizable chunk of real estate to recreating the Simpsons' hometown, as part of an attraction that will open later this year.

While we're happy to see that Americans will finally be able to enjoy Krusty burgers and drink Duff Beer, we must protest the geographic accuracy of Universal's creation. Guests will not be able to "walk the streets of Springfield," as Universal claims, but of something a little different. In terms of resemblance, it's like Hangzhou's Paris: we recognize the landmarks, but anyone who knows the real thing can attest that the two are not the same.

I'll stick with the Springfield of the mind. Or the one in Simpsons: Road Rage.

Top image via Universal Studios Orlando.

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