Rueters

Arresting images of the ordinary amid devastating war.

The news out of Syria has been one long, terrible stream of horror and atrocities. But even in the midst of war, the country's fighters have been captured putting aside their weapons for an afternoon tea. Below, a collection of images from Reuters:

A group of unemployed Iraqi men drink tea in Sayydeh Zenab, an Iraqi neighbourhood near Damascus. Since the start of the U.S.-led war on Iraq in March 2003, Iraqi refugees, who fled the country, have started to create their own community inside the Syria. An estimated 1.4 million Iraqis are now living in Syria. (Khaled al-Hariri/Reuters)
Free Syrian Army fighters use poster of Syria's President Bashar al-Assad to start a fire for heat and making tea in Aleppo. (Zain Karam/Reuters)
Members of the Free Syrian Army drink tea as they sit around a fire in Deir al-Zor . (Khalil Ashawi/Reuters)
A member of the Free Syrian Army blows a fire under a teapot, as he stands near curtains used to provide protection from snipers loyal to Syria's President Bashar al-Assad, in Deir al-Zor. (Khalil Ashawi/Reuters)

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