AS+GG

The proposed 116-story Imperial Tower will offer a slew of sustainable options.

We’ve seen grandiose new skyscrapers do all sorts of weird things. From rotating dynamic towers, to hi-rises that have enormous voids, to skyscrapers built so tall they can’t find enough occupants to rent space, architects like to try anything to come up with a headline-grabbing design.

However, Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture‘s latest proposal for Mumbai’s tallest building—the slender 116-story, 400-meter residential Imperial Tower—may take the cake. According to AS+GG, the svelte structure is designed to "confuse the wind."

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A little confused by that? Don’t worry, we were too. AS+GG’s deceptive description simply means that the extremely tall and thin (two adjectives you don’t normally associate with sturdiness) tower will stand up to the wind. Enhanced by "sky gardens," which have been designed to "dampen" wind eddying about the tower, the futuristic pencil-like structure will stand strong against a sudden gale. That should make residents of the two upper floors feel safe and secure as they gaze out to their commanding views of the Arabian Sea.

Keeping with the theme of weather, AS+GG designed the skyscraper to minimize its effects on climate change. Environmentally friendly features include rainwater harvesting, gray water recycling, and exterior cladding to limit solar heat gain. A fascinating aspect of the design is the possibility that the apartments’ kitchens and bathrooms could be prefabricated by a local factory.

While the future of the Imperial Tower may seem anything but gusty, AS+GG states that though this is a competition winner, its future is by no means certain.

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All images courtesy of AS+GG. This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

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