Reuters

A 400-foot tall spire will be attached for good some time in the next several weeks.

One World Trade Center got one step closer to being topped off today, as crane operators operators hoisted the final pieces of the 800-ton spire up to the pinnacle of Freedom Tower. The spire will sit on a temporary work platform and iron workers will finish installation of the 400-foot tall piece some time in the next couple of weeks, according to Reuters.*

When completed, the tower will stand 1,776 feet high, the tallest structure in the Western Hemisphere. Below, scenes from the event:

Iron workers photograph a crane lifting the final piece of a spire to the top of One World Trade Center in New York (Lucas Jackson/Reuters)
The final section of the spire that will top off One World Trade Center is raised past iron workers to the top of the building. (Gary Hershorn/Reuters)
An ironworker uses a line to steady the final piece of a spire. (Lucas Jackson/Reuters)
Workers affix a U.S. flag to the base of the final piece of a spire, before it is lifted to the top of One World Trade Center. (Lucas Jackson/Reuters)

* Correction: An earlier version of this post did not specify that only part of the spire was lifted today.

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