Helen Luo

"The overall atmosphere can change within walking distance."

Today's Postcard comes from Rochester, New York, where photographer and Brooklyn native Helen Luo moved to attend school.

Initially, she was drawn to her new city's suburban scenery, a sharp contrast from her home on the other side of the state. But she quickly shifted to shooting the city and its residents. "Once I decided to redirect my focus, I was able to see Rochester in a more holistic light," Luo says. "I was much more empathetic towards the city and its locals." 

As she continued to explore Rochester, she became more surprised by what she saw. "I find the placement of neighborhoods and infrastructures quite fascinating," Luo says. "The overall atmosphere can change within walking distance. Neighborhoods shift dramatically in their differing wealth, scenery and culture."

Below, some of Luo's discoveries. And if you'd like to contribute your photo project to our Postcard feature, email us at AtlanticCities.Postcard@gmail.com.

Helen Luo is a graduate of Rochester Institute of Technology. Her portfolio can be seen at Helen-Luo.com

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