If you are too scared to do it for real.

Parkour, the urban sport involving jumping from things onto other things, is not for the faint of heart. You need to be athletic, unafraid of heights, and unfazed by trespassing laws. That being said, kids do it, dogs do it, even Dwight and Michael in The Office tried to do it.

You can too, sort of, from the comfort of your desk chair (or armchair, if you've already taken off work for the holiday weekend). This video, which production company Ampisound posted on YouTube on June 28, takes the viewer parkouring through the U.K.'s Cambridge (which the University is reportedly not pleased about). The video was shot from a GoPro camera mounted on the head of James Kingston, the same guy who dangled from a construction crane in Los Angeles.

(h/t The Next Web)

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