John Sypal

On this Japanese island, you no longer have to ask strangers to take your group photos.

The Japanese have come up with something else to make our lives just a little bit better.

This time, it’s a camera stand perfectly positioned for taking classic tourist photos. Photographer John Sypal discovered a bunch of these stands at various scenic spots on the popular tourist island Enoshima. The stands can rotate 360 degrees and are positioned at the right height and distance for taking a group photo. Designed for the mobile era, the stand also comes with a vertical slot for smartphones. 

As DL Cade at PetaPixel puts it, “Who knows, we may soon say goodbye to the awkward 'this isn’t a good picture but I have to pretend it is because I’ve already asked you to retake it four times' smile for good." Cheers to one less opportunity for awkward interaction with strangers?

(h/t PetaPixel)

All images by John Sypal of tokyo camera style.

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