Le Dolci

Several people were hospitalized.

Canadian foodies may have taken the cronut craze a touch too far: Several people were hospitalized on Tuesday after eating a cronut burger, a collaboration of two Toronto restaurants that was created expressly for the Canadian National Exhibition.

Call this the Canadian version of state fair food gone horribly, horribly wrong. On Tuesday evening, paramedics attended to 12 people at the CNE who ate fair food and began suffering from symptoms including vomiting, diarrhea and stomach pain. (5 of the twelve were taken to a local hospital.) Although officials have not publicly fingered the cronut burger as the guilty party, a Toronto Public Health spokesperson told the Toronto Star's Alex Nino Gheclu that the one restaurant that offered the cronut burger, Epic Burgers and Waffles, has been closed down by the CNE for inspection. (The Globe and Mail informed Dominique Ansel Bakery, the NYC-based source of the original cronut, about the Toronto knockoff and the intention to burger-fy it before the festival began. They did not seem pleased.) Social media also offered some clues, with a number of people reporting symptoms of food poisoning -- and fingering the cronut burger as the culprit -- on Twitter:

Ah ha! So it was Epic Burger, with the cronut burger, in the fairgrounds.

To be fair, the cronut burger was actually a combination effort between Epic Burgers and Waffles and Le Dolci, a bakery in Toronto's trendy Queen West district that started serving a cronut knockoff earlier this summer. The combined effort between the two restaurants was, so far as we know, the first time anyone has combined a knockoff cronut with a burger patty. Naturally, the concoction was supposed to be one of the hottest food offerings of the CNE. No more. As one observer on Twitter put it:

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic Wire.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. a photo of a Metro PCS store in Washington, D.C.
    Equity

    What D.C.’s Go-Go Showdown Reveals About Gentrification

    A neighborhood debate over music swiftly became something bigger, and louder: a cry for self-determination from a community that is struggling to be heard.

  2. Equity

    The Hidden Horror of Hudson Yards Is How It Was Financed

    Manhattan’s new luxury mega-project was partially bankrolled by an investor visa program called EB-5, which was meant to help poverty-stricken areas.

  3. The facade of a casino in Atlantic City.
    Photos

    Photographing the Trumpian Urbanism of Atlantic City

    Brian Rose’s new book uses the deeply troubled New Jersey city as a window into how a developer-turned-president operates.

  4. A new map of neighborhood change in U.S. metros shows where displacement is the main problem, and where economic decline persists.
    Equity

    From Gentrification to Decline: How Neighborhoods Really Change

    A new report and accompanying map finds extreme gentrification in a few cities, but the dominant trend—particularly in the suburbs—is the concentration of low-income population.

  5. a photo of San Francisco tourists posing before the city's iconic skyline.
    Life

    Cities Don’t Have Souls. Why Do We Battle For Them?

    What do we mean when we say that the “soul of the city” is under threat? Often, it’s really about politics, nostalgia, and the fear of community change.