A tongue-in-cheek installment of a documentary portrait series features a feline New Yorker.

The dog days of summer may be upon us, but this Friday’s gone to the cats. In this short video, the fellows from the New Yorkers series introduce us to Suse, one of New York’s finest (kittens, that is). Suse likes to lounge, laze, and generally bum around. Occasionally, she lunges. It’s a simple life for this New York City cat.

This playful documentary is part of an ongoing series called New Yorkers that records the many faces of the city. The filmmakers have explored individuals from graffiti artist Steve Powers to a Shaolin monk, and more

For more work by Moonshot Productions, visit http://moonshot-productions.com/.

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic.

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